Posts filed under 'Buildings'

Cleveland University

In 1850 a group of prominent Clevelanders, including Mrs. Thyrza Pelton and John Giles Jennings, began plans for the founding of Cleveland University.  They purchased 275 acres of land from the Kellogg, Barber and Branch farms, on the bluff overlooking the flats.  One of the founders was Governor William Slade, Jr. who platted the surrounding area into a subdivision with streets bearing such intellectual-sounding names as Literary St., University St., College St., and one that would become Professor St.  Next to Slade’s allotment, the university was incorporated on March 5, 1851 and one building was constructed near the corner of College and University Ave.  The plan included a female seminary, an orphan asylum, and a retreat for aged persons.  The residence for the president, Rev. Asa Mahan of Oberlin Institute, was also constructed on the corner of W. 14th and Fairfield.  Pelton Park (now known as Lincoln Park) was established as part of the campus.  The trustees included Ahaz Merchant, Samuel Starkweather and Richard Hilliard. Read more …

7 comments February 7th, 2008

Lincoln Park Baths

lincolnparkbaths1201starkweather.jpg1201 Starkweather Ave.  Currently condominiums, the Lincoln Park Baths opened in 1921.  The baths were built to serve a community whose housing lacked modern plumbing.  There were separate entrances for men and women and the patrons paid between a penny and a nickel for the use of the facilities.

Info and picture courtesy of Tremont West Dev. Corp.

3 comments February 7th, 2008

Merrick House History

oldmerrickhouse1920s.jpgThe first building was at W. 11th St. and Starkweather Ave.  What you see is the original building.  The present building, built in 1949 is located at 1050 Starkweather Ave.

ORIGIN:  At the close of World War I, the once restricted “University Heights” district located on the bluff of the west bank of the Cuyahoga River had gradually changed.  Often marked by poverty, its homes were neglected, unpainted, and unrepaired.  Isolated by a river gully and a web of railroad tracks, the district became known as Tremont Area.

Poles, Russians (editors note: most likely they were Rusyns), Ukrainians, Slovaks, Germans, Irish, and people of many other nationalities lived in the congested area.  Census studies showed 144 persons per net acre as compared with 22 for the city as a whole.  Recreation facilities were inadequate.

In this area came Merrick House in 1919.  Founded under the auspices of the National Catholic War Council as a part of its post-war reconstruction work, it was a settlement and a day nursery doing non-sectarian work under Catholic auspices.  In 1923, its first headquarters was purchased with funds from the Catholic Charities Corporation.

The name “Merrick House” was taken in honor of Miss Mary Merrick, founder of the National Christ Child Society, in recognition of the interest and service given by the Cleveland Christ Child Society. Read more …

7 comments June 25th, 2007

Union Gospel Press

cleveland-university33.jpgOn January 5, 1895 in Annandale, New Jersey, The Reverend Mr. Musselman and seven women from his church began a home missionary ministry that is now known as the Gospel Worker Society. The purpose was to reach homebound people in their communities and to encourage people to receive Jesus Christ. The purpose was accomplished through missionary meetings of different venues. In 1896 a womens and a mens Society were formed. In 1897 the name of the Women’s Home Missionary Society was changed to the Gospel Worker Society because the women had become known as “Gospel Workers.”
Read more …

7 comments May 6th, 2007

Lemko Hall

lemkohall.jpg1048 Literary St.  Lemko Hall was built in 1911 by Andrew Koreny and was originally a social hall with a saloon, gambling rooms and a spacious ballroom.  It remained the home of Andrew Koreny until purchased by the Lemko Association Branch No. 6.  The local branch was formed in 1929, and the larger group was organized in Cleveland in 1931 to serve the Rusyns from the “Lemko” region of the Carpathian Mountains.  The first Lemko Social & Civic Club in Cleveland was located at 1037 Starkweather Ave. in the mid-1930’s.  By 1937 the hall moved to 1205 Starkweather, until 1946 when it moved to W. 11th St.   In 1977 the hall gained fame when it was used to film the wedding feast in the film The Deer Hunter.  In 1988, Lemko Hall was declared a landmark.

7 comments April 22nd, 2007